My Strength’s Finder 2.0 Report

Strengths Finder 2.0

I have the pdf enclosed also click GallupReport to view (much more user friendly).

Strengths Insight and Action-Planning Guide
SURVEY COMPLETION DATE: 02-15-2010

Adam Humphreys
Your Top 5 Themes
Achiever
Individualization
Ideation
Strategic
Command

What’s in This Guide?
Section I: Awareness
A brief Shared Theme Description for each of your top five themes
Your Personalized Strengths Insights, which describe what makes you stand out from others
with the same theme in their top five
Questions for you to answer to increase your awareness of your talents
Section II: Application
10 Ideas for Action for each of your top five themes
Questions for you to answer to help you apply your talents
Section III: Achievement
Examples of what each of your top five themes “sounds like” — real quotes from people who
also have the theme in their top five
Steps for you to take to help you leverage your talents for achievement
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
1
Section I: Awareness
Achiever
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Achiever theme have a great deal of stamina and work
hard. They take great satisfaction from being busy and productive.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Driven by your talents, you are able to concentrate for hours at a time. You examine new information
to deepen your understanding of various subjects. When you explore topics, customarily you generate
fresh ideas. Acquiring knowledge and skills each day adds zest to your life. Because of your
strengths, you are an enterprising person. You effortlessly launch new ventures. You are likely to
measure your progress on a regular basis. This information probably inspires you to work even
harder. It’s very likely that you consistently outwit most people. You are clever. Your mental
superiority often helps you do more and better work than you have done in the past. When your
results are compared to those of everyone else, you are determined to be the winner. By nature, you
channel your efforts into the task at hand. You persevere until you have gained the knowledge and
skills needed to attain a goal. You can toil for many hours to secure your objective. You probably work
hardest and most productively at a particular time of day. Chances are good that you may approach
your job or your studies with a no-nonsense, businesslike attitude. This partially explains why people
think you have a strong work ethic.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
2
Individualization
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Individualization theme are intrigued with the unique
qualities of each person. They have a gift for figuring out how people who are different can work
together productively.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Driven by your talents, you sense that every person is one of a kind. You can quickly discover what
makes someone distinct from everyone else. By nature, you enhance your own quality of life each
time you reach out to someone in need of assistance. It’s very likely that you automatically notice
what people do well. You pay attention to their individual interests, too. Combining this information,
you are likely to understand who should work and should not work together. You probably create
partnerships where one person’s talents complement those of another person. You tend to match
people to tasks they enjoy. Because of your strengths, you appreciate frank, candid, or blunt
comments about things you need to do better. You probably have a reputation for being able to
handle criticism. Actually, you go to individuals who will be truthful with you about your shortcomings.
You really want to hear their comments. Why? You think you can make more progress when you
concentrate on overcoming your flaws and mistakes. Instinctively, you enjoy working and studying
with people whose backgrounds, cultures, talents, or experiences are quite different from one another.
You usually are the one who determines how each individual can contribute to the group.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
3
Ideation
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Ideation theme are fascinated by ideas. They are able to
find connections between seemingly disparate phenomena.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
By nature, you are apt to be the person teammates, classmates, or coworkers pull into brainstorming
sessions. Why? You have the assertiveness to speak up when you think of something. You also
generate more ideas than most people do. You are creative. You are imaginative. You are not
embarrassed to think out loud. Because of your strengths, you are an original and innovative thinker.
Others frequently rely on you to generate novel concepts, theories, plans, or solutions. You refuse to
be stifled by traditions or trapped by routines. You probably bristle when someone says, “We can’t
change that. We’ve always done it this way.” Instinctively, you have a rich vocabulary upon which to
draw. The words you choose often expand and challenge your listeners’ or readers’ thinking. Driven
by your talents, you generate ideas quickly. You draw clever linkages between facts, events, people,
problems, or solutions. You present others with numerous options at a pace some find dizzying. Your
innovative thinking tends to foster ongoing dialogue between and among the group’s participants. It’s
very likely that you often are the originator of fresh ideas for brand-new campaigns, business
ventures, initiatives, or special events.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
4
Strategic
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Strategic theme create alternative ways to proceed. Faced
with any given scenario, they can quickly spot the relevant patterns and issues.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Because of your strengths, you characteristically find the right words to express whatever you are
thinking. You offer explanations, discuss ideas, give examples, or share stories. You effectively use
the spoken word. By nature, you are innovative, inventive, original, and resourceful. Your mind allows
you to venture beyond the commonplace, the familiar, or the obvious. You entertain ideas about the
best ways to reach a goal, increase productivity, or solve a problem. First, you think of alternatives.
Then you choose the best option. Instinctively, you easily enter into dialogue with others. When you
have an idea, the right words, stories, or examples quickly come to mind. The animated give-and-take
of debates stimulates your thinking. Often you gain the advantage by emphasizing irrefutable — that
is, cannot be disproved — facts to support your key arguments. Victory for you means having the final
word. Chances are good that you generate innovative ideas. You offer unique perspectives on events,
people, and proposals. You probably inspire people to start projects and launch initiatives. You tend to
identify a goal, devise numerous ways of reaching it, then choose the best alternative. This explains
why you see opportunities, trends, and solutions before your teammates, classmates, or peers see
them. It’s very likely that you select the right combination of words to convey your ideas or feelings. In
the middle of discussions, your vocabulary provides you with precise phrases and terminology. You
probably express yourself with ease and grace.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
5
Command
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Command theme have presence. They can take control of a
situation and make decisions.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Chances are good that you may declare life is good when once in a while you can take a chance.
Perhaps you need fewer guarantees of success than some people require. It’s very likely that you
might work hard to be liked. Perhaps you find something special about each person you meet. This
might be one way you ingratiate yourself — that is, win the favor of — certain individuals. Driven by
your talents, you commonly embolden — that is, give courage to — people by convincing them that
their individual contributions are quite noteworthy and valuable. Instinctively, you periodically issue
direct orders to certain individuals. Some may feel you are overstepping the bounds of your authority
or are being a bit bossy. Perhaps this is just your way of influencing some people to apply their time or
energy to the task at hand. By nature, you might enjoy discovering complicated words and committing
their meanings to memory. Maybe you are pleased to add a few uncommon terms to your vocabulary.
Possibly few things please you more than showcasing bits and pieces of your newfound vocabulary in
conversations, discussions, or presentations. Perhaps you are taken aback — that is, surprised and
confused — if some people feel threatened by your command of language.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
6
Questions
1. How does this information help you better understand your unique talents?
2. How can you use this understanding to add value to your role?
3. How can you apply this knowledge to add value to your team, workgroup, department, or
division?
4. How will this understanding help you add value to your organization?
5. What will you do differently tomorrow as a result of this report?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
7
Section II: Application
Achiever
Ideas for Action:
Select jobs that allow you to have the leeway to work as hard as you want and in which
you are encouraged to measure your own productivity. You will feel challenged and alive
in these environments.
As an achiever, you relish the feeling of being busy, yet you also need to know when you
are “done.” Attach timelines and measurement to goals so that effort leads to defined
progress and tangible outcomes.
Remember to build celebration and recognition into your life. Achievers tend to move on to
the next challenge without acknowledging their successes. Counter this impulse by
creating regular opportunities to enjoy your progress and accomplishments.
Your drive for action might cause you to find meetings a bit boring. If that’s the case,
appeal to your Achiever talents by learning the objectives of each meeting ahead of time
and by taking notes about progress toward those objectives during the meeting. You can
help ensure that meetings are productive and efficient.
Continue your education by attaining certifications in your area or specialty in addition to
attending conferences and other programs. This will give you even more goals to achieve
and will push your existing boundaries of accomplishment.
You do not require much motivation from others. Take advantage of your self-motivation
by setting challenging goals. Set a more demanding goal every time you finish a project.
Partner with other hard workers. Share your goals with them so they can help you to get
more done.
Count personal achievements in your scoring “system.” This will help you direct your
Achiever talents toward family and friends as well as toward work.
More work excites you. The prospect of what lies ahead is infinitely more motivating than
what has been completed. Launch initiatives and new projects. Your seemingly endless
reserve of energy will create enthusiasm and momentum.
Make sure that in your eagerness to do more at work, you do not skimp on quality. Create
measurable outcome standards to guarantee that increased productivity is matched by
enhanced quality.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
8
Individualization
Ideas for Action:
Select a vocation in which your Individualization talents can be both used and appreciated,
such as counseling, supervising, teaching, writing human interest articles, or selling. Your
ability to see people as unique individuals is a special talent.
Become an expert in describing your own strengths and style. For example, answer
questions such as: What is the best praise you ever received? How often do you like to
check in with your manager? What is your best method for building relationships? How do
you learn best? Then ask your colleagues and friends these same questions. Help them
plan their future by starting with their strengths, then designing a future based on what
they do best.
Help others understand that true diversity can be found in the subtle differences between
each individual — regardless of race, sex, or nationality.
Explain that it is appropriate, just, and effective to treat each person differently. Those
without strong Individualization talents might not see the differences among individuals
and might insist that individualization is unequal and therefore unfair. You will need to
describe your perspective in detail to be persuasive.
Figure out what every person on your team does best. Then help them capitalize on their
talents, skills, and knowledge. You may need to explain your rationale and your philosophy
so people understand that you have their best interests in mind.
You have an awareness and appreciation of others’ likes and dislikes and an ability to
personalize. This puts you in a unique position. Use your Individualization talents to help
identify areas where one size does not fit all.
Make your colleagues and friends aware of each person’s unique needs. Soon people will
look to you to explain other people’s motivations and actions.
Your presentations and speaking opportunities will be most engaging when you relate your
topic to the experiences of individuals in the audience. Use your Individualization talents to
gather and share real-life stories that will make your points much better than would generic
information or theories.
You move comfortably among a broad range of styles and cultures, and you intuitively
personalize your interactions. Consciously and proactively make full use of these talents
by leading diversity and community efforts.
Your Individualization talents can help you take a different approach to interpreting data.
While others are looking for similarities, make a point of identifying distinctiveness. Your
interpretations will add a valuable perspective.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
9
Ideation
Ideas for Action:
Seek a career in which you will be given credit for and paid for your ideas, such as
marketing, advertising, journalism, design, or new product development.
You are likely to get bored quickly, so make some small changes in your work or home life.
Experiment. Play mental games with yourself. All of these will help keep you stimulated.
Finish your thoughts and ideas before communicating them. Lacking your Ideation talents,
others might not be able to “join the dots” of an interesting but incomplete idea and thus
might dismiss it.
Not all your ideas will be equally practical or serviceable. Learn to edit your ideas, or find a
trusted friend or colleague who can “proof” your ideas and identify potential pitfalls.
Understand the fuel for your Ideation talents: When do you get your best ideas? When
you’re talking with people? When you’re reading? When you’re simply listening or
observing? Take note of the circumstances that seem to produce your best ideas, and
recreate them.
Schedule time to read, because the ideas and experiences of others can become your raw
material for new ideas. Schedule time to think, because thinking energizes you.
You are a natural fit with research and development; you appreciate the mindset of
visionaries and dreamers. Spend time with imaginative peers, and sit in on their
brainstorming sessions.
Partner with someone with strong Analytical talents. This person will question you and
challenge you, therefore strengthening your ideas.
Sometimes you lose others’ interest because they cannot follow your abstract and
conceptual thinking style. Make your ideas more concrete by drawing pictures, using
analogies or metaphors, or simply explaining your concepts step by step.
Feed your Ideation talents by gathering knowledge. Study fields and industries different
from your own. Apply ideas from outside, and link disparate ideas to generate new ones.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
10
Strategic
Ideas for Action:
Take the time to fully reflect or muse about a goal that you want to achieve until the related
patterns and issues emerge for you. Remember that this musing time is essential to
strategic thinking.
You can see repercussions more clearly than others can. Take advantage of this ability by
planning your range of responses in detail. There is little point in knowing where events will
lead if you are not ready when you get there.
Find a group that you think does important work, and contribute your strategic thinking.
You can be a leader with your ideas.
Your strategic thinking will be necessary to keep a vivid vision from deteriorating into an
ordinary pipe dream. Fully consider all possible paths toward making the vision a reality.
Wise forethought can remove obstacles before they appear.
Make yourself known as a resource for consultation with those who are stumped by a
particular problem or hindered by a particular obstacle or barrier. By naturally seeing a way
when others are convinced there is no way, you will lead them to success.
You are likely to anticipate potential issues more easily than others. Though your
awareness of possible danger might be viewed as negativity by some, you must share
your insights if you are going to avoid these pitfalls. To prevent misperception of your
intent, point out not only the future obstacle, but also a way to prevent or overcome it.
Trust your insights, and use them to ensure the success of your efforts.
Help others understand that your strategic thinking is not an attempt to belittle their ideas,
but is instead a natural propensity to consider all the facets of a plan objectively. Rather
than being a naysayer, you are actually trying to examine ways to ensure that the goal is
accomplished, come what may. Your talents will allow you to consider others’ perspectives
while keeping your end goal in sight.
Trust your intuitive insights as often as possible. Even though you might not be able to
explain them rationally, your intuitions are created by a brain that instinctively anticipates
and projects. Have confidence in these perceptions.
Partner with someone with strong Activator talents. With this person’s need for action and
your need for anticipation, you can forge a powerful partnership.
Make sure that you are involved in the front end of new initiatives or enterprises. Your
innovative yet procedural approach will be critical to the genesis of a new venture because
it will keep its creators from developing deadly tunnel vision.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
11
Command
Ideas for Action:
Your Command talents might compel you to wrestle for the reins of power because you
love being in the driver’s seat. But remember that even when you are not formally in
charge, your presence can be an unseen yet powerfully felt force.
Step up and break bottlenecks. Others count on your natural decisiveness to get things
moving. When you remove roadblocks, you often create new momentum and success that
would not have existed without you.
Consider taking the lead on a committee. You have definite ideas about what you would
like to see happen, and you can naturally influence a group to follow you. You might be
comfortable spearheading new initiatives.
Seek roles in which you will be asked to persuade others. Consider whether selling would
be a good career for you.
Find a cause you believe in and support it. You might discover yourself at your best when
defending a cause in the face of resistance.
You will always be ready to confront. Practice the words, the tone, and the techniques that
will turn your ability to confront into real persuasiveness.
In your relationships, seize opportunities to speak plainly and directly about sensitive
subjects. Your unwillingness to hide from the truth can become a source of strength and
constancy for your colleagues and friends. Strive to become known as a candid person.
Ask people for their opinions. Sometimes your candor will be intimidating, causing others
to tread lightly for fear of your reaction. Watch for this. If necessary, explain that you are
upfront simply because it feels uncomfortable to keep things bottled up, not because you
want to frighten other people into silence.
Partner with someone with strong Woo or Empathy talents. Some obstacles do not need to
be confronted; they can be circumvented. This person can help you avoid obstacles
through relationships.
Your “take charge” attitude steadies and reassures others in times of crisis. When faced
with a particularly trying challenge, use your Command talents to assuage others’ fears
and convince them you have things under control.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
12
Section III: Achievement
Look for signs of achievement as you read these real quotes from people who share your top five
themes.
Achiever sounds like this:
Melanie K., ER nurse: “I have to rack up points every day to feel successful. Today I’ve been here
only half an hour, but I’ve probably racked up thirty points already. I ordered equipment for the ER, I
had equipment repaired, I had a meeting with my charge nurse, and I brainstormed with my secretary
about improving our computerized logbook. So on my list of ninety things, I have thirty done already.
I’m feeling pretty good about myself right now.”
Ted S., salesperson: “Last year I was salesperson of the year out of my company’s three hundred
salespeople. It felt good for a day, but sure enough, later that week, it was as if it never happened. I
was back at zero again. Sometimes I wish I wasn’t an achiever because it can lead me away from a
balanced life and toward obsession. I used to think I could change myself, but now I know I am just
wired this way. This theme is truly a double-edged sword. It helps me achieve my goals, but on the
other hand, I wish I could just turn it off and on at will. But, hey, I can’t. I can manage it and avoid work
obsession by focusing on achieving in all parts of my life, not just work.”
Sara L., writer: “This theme is a weird one. First, it’s good because you live in pursuit of the perpetual
challenge. But in the second place, you never feel as though you’ve reached your goal. It can keep
you running uphill at seventy miles an hour for your whole life. You never rest because there’s always
more to do. But, on balance, I think I would rather have it than not. I call it my ‘divine restlessness,’
and if it makes me feel as if I owe the present everything I have, then so be it. I can live with that.”
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
13
Individualization sounds like this:
Les T., hospitality manager: “Carl is one of our best performers, but he still has to see me every week.
He just wants a little encouragement and to check in, and he gets fired up a little bit after that meeting.
Greg doesn’t like to meet very often, so there’s no need for me to bother him. And when we do meet,
it’s really for me, not for him.”
Marsha D., publishing executive: “Sometimes I would walk out of my office and — you know how
cartoon characters have those balloons over their head? I would see these little balloons over
everyone’s head telling me what was in their minds. It sounds weird, doesn’t it? But it happens all the
time.”
Andrea H., interior designer: “When you ask people what their style is, they find it hard to describe, so
I just ask them, ‘What is your favorite spot in the house?’ And when I ask that, their faces light up, and
they know just where to take me. From that one spot, I can begin to piece together the kind of people
they are and what their style is.”
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
14
Ideation sounds like this:
Mark B., writer: “My mind works by finding connections between things. When I was hunting down the
Mona Lisa in the Louvre museum, I turned a corner and was blinded by the flashing of a thousand
cameras snapping the tiny picture. For some reason, I stored that visual image away. Then I noticed a
‘No Flash Photography’ sign, and I stored that away too. I thought it was odd because I remembered
reading that flash photography can harm paintings. Then about six months later, I read that the Mona
Lisa has been stolen at least twice in this century. And suddenly I put it all together. The only
explanation for all these facts is that the real Mona Lisa is not on display in the Louvre. The real Mona
Lisa has been stolen, and the museum, afraid to admit their carelessness, has installed a fake. I don’t
know if it’s true, of course, but what a great story.”
Andrea H., interior designer: “I have the kind of mind where everything has to fit together or I start to
feel very odd. For me, every piece of furniture represents an idea. It serves a discrete function both
independently and in concert with every other piece. The ‘idea’ of each piece is so powerful in my
mind, it must be obeyed. If I am sitting in a room where the chairs are somehow not fulfilling their
discrete function — they’re the wrong kind of chairs or they’re facing the wrong way or they’re pushed
up too close to the coffee table — I find myself getting physically uncomfortable and mentally
distracted. Later, I won’t be able to get it out of my mind. I’ll find myself awake at 3:00 a.m., and I walk
through the person’s house in my mind’s eye, rearranging the furniture and repainting the walls. This
started happening when I was very young, say seven years old.”
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
15
Strategic sounds like this:
Liam C., manufacturing plant manager: “It seems as if I can always see the consequences before
anyone else can. I have to say to people, ‘Lift up your eyes; look down the road a ways. Let’s talk
about where we are going to be next year so that when we get to this time next year, we don’t have
the same problems.’ It seems obvious to me, but some people are just too focused on this month’s
numbers, and everything is driven by that.”
Vivian T., television producer: “I used to love logic problems when I was a kid — you know, the ones
where ‘if A implies B, and B equals C, does A equal C?’ Still today, I am always playing out
repercussions, seeing where things lead. I think it makes me a great interviewer. I know that nothing
is an accident; every sign, every word, every tone of voice has significance. So I watch for these clues
and play them out in my head, see where they lead, and then plan my questions to take advantage of
what I have seen in my head.”
Simon T., human resources executive: “We really needed to take the union on at some stage, and I
saw an opportunity — a very good issue to take them on. I could see that they were going in a
direction that would lead them into all kinds of trouble if they continued following it. Lo and behold,
they did continue following it, and when they arrived, there I was, ready and waiting. I suppose it just
comes naturally to me to predict what someone else is going to do. And then when that person reacts,
I can respond immediately because I have sat down and said, ‘Okay, if they do this, we’ll do this. If
they do that, then we’ll do this other thing.’ It’s like when you tack in a sailboat. You head in one
direction, but you jinx one way, then another, planning and reacting, planning and reacting.”
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
16
Command sounds like this:
Malcolm M., hospitality manager: “One reason I affect people is that I am so candid. Actually, people
say that I intimidate them at first. After I work with them a year, we talk about that sometimes. They
say, ‘Boy, Malcolm, when I started working here, I was scared to death.’ When I ask why, they say,
‘I’ve never worked with anyone who just said it. Whatever it was, whatever needed to be said, you just
said it.’”
Rick P., retail executive: “We have a wellness program whereby if you consume less than four
alcoholic beverages a week, you get twenty-five dollars; if you don’t smoke, you get twenty-five dollars
a month. So one day I got word that one of my store managers was smoking again. This was not
good. He was smoking in the store, setting a bad example for the employees, and claiming his twentyfive
dollars. I just can’t keep stuff like that inside. It wasn’t comfortable, but I confronted him with it
immediately and clearly: ‘Stop doing that, or you are fired.’ He’s basically a good guy, but you can’t let
things like that slide.”
Diane N., hospice worker: “I don’t think of myself as assertive, but I do take charge. When you walk
into a room with a dying person and his family, you have to take charge. They want you to take
charge. They are a bit in shock, a bit frightened, a bit in denial. Basically, they’re confused. They need
someone to tell them what is going to happen next, what they can expect — that it’s not going to be
fun but that in some important ways, it will be all right. They don’t want mousy and soft. They want
clarity and honesty. I provide it.”
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
17
Questions
1. Talk to friends or coworkers to hear how they have used their talents to achieve.
2. How will you use your talents to achieve?
147460789 (Adam Humphreys)

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